DragonCon Art Show

This past Labor Day Weekend I participated in the DragonCon Art Show! It is an amazing convention that I am so happy to have been a part of. This was by far the largest convention I have shown at which was a little intimidating, but mostly exciting. Fellow artists and attendees were extremely kind and inviting making the long days go by fast.

I am very proud of my setup. I think this is the best organization I've had yet ;)

I had so many new pieces to bring to DragonCon and I decided to pre-sign all of my prints just in-case it got super busy.

A highlight of the show for me was selling the original drawing Respite in the Pine Haunt in the art auction. I love seeing my art find a forever home <3 Especially when it is such a personal piece!

I can't wait to return next year!

Shifting Visions for Light Grey Art Lab

It was a privileged to participate in Light Grey Art Lab's Never Odd or Even show this month; exploring duality and paradox. 

My statement:
My piece for the Light Grey Art Lab’s Never Odd or Even show I wanted to explore first impressions. Our initial experience shapes so much of our perspective; whether it be of people, places, foods, etc. There is always a deeper understanding to be found if we take the time to learn and listen. My favorite example of this is the wolverine. Maybe your first experience was seeing a photo of a wolverine and understood that it is basically a large badger, but didn’t know it scales mountains with ease and survives the harshest winters eating bones.Or maybe you heard of its reputation as a fierce fighter and that many don’t hesitate to challenge bears for food, but didn’t realize that it is weighs only about 30 pounds and are very social creatures with both parents raising young. I try to remember that there is always more than meets the eye.

See more art by my incredible peers here: http://lightgreyartlab.com/never-odd-or-even
Prints are available for purchase here: http://shop.lightgreyartlab.com/collections/never-odd-or-even-paradox-and-duality/products/shifting-visions-by-julie-wilmore

Where it all begins...the thumbnail that I like enough to draw it out. I probably thumb between 6 and 24 ideas before settling on the one that feels the best. I believe I went through about a dozen before this guy.

Where it all begins...the thumbnail that I like enough to draw it out. I probably thumb between 6 and 24 ideas before settling on the one that feels the best. I believe I went through about a dozen before this guy.

The underdrawing is possibly the most important stage - it is the very important guide for my paintbrush and pencils. Beyond the drawing I also keep the original thumbnail and notes of textures and value close by while I work...lots of notes.

The underdrawing is possibly the most important stage - it is the very important guide for my paintbrush and pencils. Beyond the drawing I also keep the original thumbnail and notes of textures and value close by while I work...lots of notes.

The first pass of powdered charcoal; this is my favorite stage - It feels like sculpting the form out of the paper.

The first pass of powdered charcoal; this is my favorite stage - It feels like sculpting the form out of the paper.

Mostly finished with the wolverine here - just some details in the fur, face and claws to go.

Mostly finished with the wolverine here - just some details in the fur, face and claws to go.

This was my first time adding white gouache over a drawing. Needless to say it was nervewracking.

This was my first time adding white gouache over a drawing. Needless to say it was nervewracking.

A starry mountain of possibilities!

A starry mountain of possibilities!

And the final piece including color! 

And the final piece including color! 

Detail of the face.

Detail of the face.

Making of Boundless Nocturne

Boundless Nocturne started off with a more developed thumbnail than usual. I was so excited to get started on this piece after working this image out!

That thumbnail was then transferred to bristol so I could continue to refine the details in pencil before adding any charcoal.

My favorite element of this piece is the way the eyes and the misty clouds merge. I love when environment and character become one.

Below is the final drawing.

Thanks for following my process! Limited Edition Prints are available in my store!

Traversing the Pine Haunt

Traversing the Pine Haunt began like most of my work with an itsy bitsy sketch. 


I blow this sketch up to the size I want to work with and transfer the loose lines and build my underdrawing
from there.


With the details fleshed out in pencil I begin to add value using layers of powdered charcoal and carbon pencil.


I slowly build up the values and try to get as much texture and little details - especially in the darkest areas.


Bearwip.jpg

Once the drawing is complete - I scan it and make minor adjustments. I then add color using many transparent layers to achieve the desired effect. I do a final pass of thin white strokes to make the detail/focus areas pop. 

Making of Hone Claws

This is about the level I take my pencil underdrawings to - enough detail to base the powder and carbon on.

The first layers go down in powdered charcoal to start off with some value and texture.

I use the carbon pencil to work up details, value and texture! The Carbon pencil is great because it is more controllable than charcoal, but has its deep matte blacks.

I tend to save the eyes for last. Not sure why, but getting the rest of the image to a solid point is as important as the eyes, 

I build up color slowly using transparent layers in Photoshop, building up warm and cool tones until I reach the desired mood.

Process of Forte

I keep a tiny sketchbook on me at all times. It is perfect for when I am taking the bus or train but don't want to lug around my large hardcover sketchbook. Being able to scratch down ideas on the go is just so important because I can only hold onto so many pictures in my head.

After transferring and refining the sketch I come in with powdered charcoal for some base values - especially in the softer areas like fur or sky - then add details and texture using a carbon pencil.

At this stage I am deepening the darkest blacks and making sure the details are all there.

Usually I finish a piece with some soft digital color, but for Forte I always intended to keep it black and white. So I have just cleaned up a few edges and smudges to tighten the lines.